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Trivia - S4E5
The Departed
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Portwenn Online
A Magical Cornish Village
Doc Martin is
IN
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Literary Reference - There is a 2006 Academy Award winning film by this name, but the themes in the film don't
seem to match anything in this episode.  The film is about the mafia vs the police and involves many of the
characters working undercover on both sides.  It appears that there is no connection to this episode.
Connecting the Episode Title to the Storylines
This is probably one of the few episodes that doesn't have a lot of links to the various storylines.  The title is an
obvious reference to poor Jim Selkirk who dies on the train while seated next to Martin, but sticks around for the
entire episode because Mrs Selkirk constantly sees him as she moves about the village.  Even in the end, when
Martin goes to the aid of Mrs Selkirk and finally diagnoses her medical issue, Jim seems to be there.  Mrs Selkirk
says that Jim had his prize sheep, Sheila, butt her so that Martin would have to come.  As Martin gets up to leave
and he calls it "absolute nonsense", he is butted by Sheila and Mrs Selkirk smiles knowingly.  She tells Martin, "Jim
says you did him proud, Doc."  Martin responds, "Yes, I'm sure he does" just as he gets to the gate which magically
opens for him with no one around.  Martin looks a little spooked.
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Original Broadcast:  Oct 18, 2009

EASTER EGGS - Martin is standing in the Wenn's kitchen, grabs some paper towels and bends down to clean off his shoe because Theo
threw up on it.  As he turns his head to stand up, his face is just inches from Claire's bum as she is leaning over to take food out of the oven.

FOOD - Jim Selkirk is eating from a bag of crisps (chips) while he is sitting next to Martin on the train.  Of course, when he has a heart attack
and dies shortly after, Martin attributes his death to his diet of junk food.

FOOD - Martin is preparing fish for his dinner when Edith stops in to inquire about his trip to London.

FOOD - Martin is leaving the Wenn house after attending to Theo when he stops in on their dinner party and warns everyone about eating the
food that has been prepared by Claire.

HAEMOPHOBIA - Martin turns away and gulps after he looks at the bloody wound on Mrs Selkirk's forehead (after she was butted by Sheila,
the prize sheep).

LOOK BACK - Louisa scowls as she watches Martin walk away from attending Theo Wenn in the chicken coop.  (Probably because Martin has
just matter of factly said that he was locked in a cupboard all the time as a child.)

LOOK BACK - Martin encounters Louisa outside the Wenn house for the second time and they have a short discussion about parents taking
responsibility for their child.  Martin appears to have a small epiphany at this and wistfully watches Louisa walk into the house to deliver Theo's  
homework.

LOUISA STANDING UP - After his contentious visit to attend to Theo Wenn, Martin leaves after giving terse instructions to the parents.  Louisa
had also been called there by the Wenns and as she leaves to follow Martin, she says, "You know, Martin is a very, very good Doctor."  Mrs
Wenn's responds snarkily, "You're carrying his child, aren't you?"

MRS TISHELL - Martin stops in for some medication and Mrs T tries to engage him in conversation about her observations of Mrs Selkirk's
bizarre behaviour (although she actually gives him some important information).  As he leaves, she says, "Come back soon.  I'm always here
for you."

NICE MARTIN - Martin is arriving at the surgery porch after attending Theo Wenn and Mrs Selkirk is standing there waiting for him.  She tells
him again that her late husband is with her.  This time he seems to show a real concern for her.  He asks her a couple of questions to
determine her mental well-being, and even though she passes the test he tells her that he would still like to have the district nurse check in on
her.

SOCK MONKEY - The sock monkey is still on Pauline's desk.
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QUOTES
Robert
Martin
Robert
Martin
Robert
How does it feel?
Good.
Must bring back some memories, huh?
Yes.
I think I detect a note of excitement there.
Robert

Martin
My work with the Lord Select Committee is taking me down that way in a couple of weeks.  Be an opportunity for you
and I to have some lunch.
There are one or two restaurants that pass basic hygiene standards.
Jim

Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim

Martin
Jim

Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim
Martin
Jim
Martin
Doc!  Hey!  Jim.  Jim Selkirk.  You treated me for impetigo a few months back, remember?  Well, it's all cleared up.  
Look, just like you said it would.  Didn't get a chance to thank you.
You're welcome.
Hey, you, uh, you down for the sheep's trials as well then?
No.
No. Probably not your thing.  Same as the wife.  She just doesn't see it at all.
Right.
So I tell her, I say, to come down onto the field.  See how Sheila...oh, that's my, uh, my prize ewe.  Beautiful sheep, so
she is.  See how Sheila reacts to them dogs.  It's amazing.
Actually, I think that seat's reserved.
Huh?  Uh, no, no.  I think I'm alight.  Ah.  Of course, you were reading.  I'm sorry.  Me and my big mouth.  Yap, yap,
yapping away.  This, um, this impetigo I had.  Is it likely to come back?
Uh, it's possible.
Oh, hey.  I'm glad that I bumped into you.  Cause...can you hear that?
No.
Hmmm. Clicks sometimes when I do that.
Well, don;t do that then.
What?
If you have a medical issue make an appointment and come to the surgery.
Oh, yeah, but seeing as you're here, you know.
I'm not at work.
It's only my wrist.
Appointment!
Louisa
Aunt Joan

Louisa
Aunt Joan
Louisa
I really appreciate you letting us do this.
Oh, I enjoy it.  Maybe we could make it a regular thing - school trips.  I'm sure we could, we could come to some sort
of...arrangement.
What?  Money, you mean?
Not a lot.  But, uh, well.  Every little bit helps.
We just don't have any.  I mean, I would if I could, but there's, there's nothing in the budget.   
Conductor
Martin
Conductor
Martin
Conductor
Martin
Conductor
Martin
I've never seen a dead body before.  I'm not really sure what to do.  I, I, uh, missed that day of training.
Ah, it's best we get a move on.
But he's, you know, dead.
It's not a condition that's going to change the longer the longer we stop here.
Well, maybe we should say something.
He won't hear.
Probably gone to a better place.
Well, at least one of us has.  
Conductor
Martin
I suppose it reminds you how precious life is.  You know, live each moment to the last.  Carpe diem.  Hakuna matata.
Well, this man celebrated his precious life by eating junk food and giving himself a heart attack.  
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin

Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Louisa.
Yes, something's happened.
To the baby?
No, um.  He, he can’t breathe!  He, he's all stiff!
Calm down.  Speak normally.
It's Theo Wenn.  He's, he's a child in my class.  We're, we're up at Joan's farm and he's having some kind of attack.
Hold the phone where I can hear his breathing. Sounds like he's hyperventilating.  Possibly a panic attack.  That's when
the lack of oxygen compared to carbon dioxide in his bloodstream...
Don't explain why!  Just tell me what to do!
Have him breathe into a paper bag for a minute or two.  That should raise his carbon dioxide level.
Paper bag.
It's common.  It's nothing to worry about.  If his breathing doesn't improve, call me back.
Martin.  There is a young child, in my care, lying on the ground, barely able to breathe.  How quickly are you gonna be
here?
Aunt Joan
Louisa
Aunt Joan
Louisa
Louisa.
Please, don't say anything.
I know you're angry.
No, I'm not angry Joan.  That is not even close.  What you did today, what you did to that poor boy, anger is too, too
SMALL to cover it.
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Aunt Joan
Louisa
Aunt Joan
Louisa
Martin

Aunt Joan
Martin
Has his condition improved?
A little, yes.
As I said on the telephone, probably just a panic attack.
Should never have got into that state in the first place.
He could have seriously hurt my birds!
That doesn't justify locking him in a chicken coop!
Well, somebody's got to teach them that that sort of behaviour is totally unacceptable.
By doing something even more unacceptable?
Well, clearly there was a discipline issue, but perhaps a chicken coop isn't the best place for a child.  Either way, having
a pregnant woman and a pensioner arguing in front of him isn't going to make him feel any better.
Children need discipline.  I just wanted to teach...I didn't mean this to happen.
Well, I was locked in a cupboard under the stairs all the time as a child.  It didn't affect me.  Um, you can take him
home.  Make sure he gets plenty of rest.  Auntie Joan.  If you need me, give me a call.  
Edith
Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith

Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith

Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith
Martin
Edith
Were you expecting me? (big knife in Martin's hand)
No, no I was just preparing my evening meal.  Come in.
Thank you.  So, London went well then.
Why do you say that?
You always prepared something exotic when you were in a good mood.  Which was rare.  Probably why I remember.
London was fine, yes.
And the thorny issue of your haemophobia?
I told Robert it wasn't an issue.
Well, that's not exactly true, is it?  You couldn't even hold a bag of blood without passing out.  If anything, your problem
is increasing the closer you get to leaving.
Are you saying that my subconscious doesn't want me to leave?
Oh, wouldn't that be disturbing?
Highly improbable.
Do you still have that card I gave you?
Yes.
You know, Dr Milligan is brilliant.  His paper on therapeutic approaches to social retardation is the best I've seen.  In
fact, I spoke to him about you.
Did you?
Yes.  Why don't we call and make an appointment?  Cut to the chase.
There's no need.  I've made an appointment.  I'm seeing him tomorrow.
I'm impressed.  Well done, Ellingham.  You're finally finding your feet.  Enjoy your sushi.  Bloodless, of course.
Would you like to join me?  There's plenty of fish.
Thank you.  But I've eaten.  Maybe some other time.  
Bert
Al
Bert

Al
Aunt Joan
Bert
Aunt Joan
Bert
Of course I knew it was gonna happen.
You knew she's lock someone in a chicken coop?
Well, I knew that something would happen, with her in the house by herself, all isolated.  I mean, that's how folks go
bodmin.  Ha.  It's the wind on the moors.  It drives them crazy.
You'd better hope those doors are locked in case she comes at you with a carving knife.  Whee, whee, whee.
Carry on.  Please.  Don't mind me.
Oh, we didn't mean no offense, Joan.
Yes you did.  You just didn't mean me to hear.
Yes.  And that, too.  
Martin
Claire

Martin
Claire
Martin
Claire
Martin
Dr Ellingham.
Yeah, yeah, I know who you are.  Listen, Doc.  Can I ask you a question?  My tan, right?  I went to Costa Rica on a hen
weekend with the girls, and it's starting to fade.
I was called to see Theo Wenn.
I was gonna top it up at that sunbed place in Delabole, but my friend says it's dangerous or something.
Yes.  Excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays increases the risk of melanoma or even basal carcinoma.
Didn't understand a word of that.
It's...bad!  Theo...Wenn!  
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan

Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
I'm sure it won’t come to anything.
Juliet Wenn has instructed a solicitor.  You can't ignore the seriousness of the situation.
The Wenn's have been scrabbling for every penny since Richard lost the boat business.  That's what all this bother is
about.  And we both know I did not cause that boy's illness.
No, we don't. There's every chance that you did.
Oh, damn!  You're supposed to be supporting me.
I am.
I'm not an idiot, Marty.  I know how serious this could get, but I cannot change what happened.  Oh God.
You all right?
If this keeps up, I shall end up like poor old Jim Selkirk.
You, you have a much better diet than he did.  
Martin
Dr Milligan

Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan

Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan

Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan

Martin
Dr Milligan
Martin
Dr Milligan
I'm here to see Dr Milligan.  You're Dr Milligan.
That's right.  So, Dr Montgomery, um, Edith, has spoken to me a little about the trouble you're having.  But, I thought it'd
be a good idea if you told me about it.
Right.
Just any general thoughts.
I have an aversion to the sight of blood and the smell of burning flesh.
And how does that make you feel?
I'm a surgeon.  It's extremely inconvenient.
And how does that affect you, personally?
It's inconvenient.
I see.  And Martin, what is it that you hope to get out of these sessions with me?
I'd like the inconvenience to stop.  
Isn't being a surgeon all about being in control?  The precision.  Wouldn't the worst thing for a surgeon be to lose that
control? I wonder if it's not the fear of losing control that's bringing about this crisis?
That your theory or Dr Montgomery's?
Does it matter?
No.  It's psychoanalytical claptrap either way.
Well, then, it's her theory.  It would help me to understand if I knew more about what you're faced with.  Could you
imagine for me that you are in the operating theatre performing some procedure?  And talk me through it step-by-step.
Now?
Yes, now.  It, it might help you if you close your eyes.  What do you see?
Nothing.  My eyes are closed.
I mean, what would you see in an operating theatre?
I would see the operating theatre.
And?
I, um...
You're uncomfortable doing this.
You have a nasal whistle when you breathe.  It's distracting.  Probably caused by a perforated septum.
I think you're derailing our session to avoid dealing with the issue.  You, you won't get better if you won't engage with
the problem.  At the end of the day, that's all that counts.  It doesn't make a difference to me.  I can sit here all day.
I can't.
Would it help you if I told you that you weren't running from me but from yourself?
No, it wouldn't.
All right.  We'll end the session there.  I'll be in touch.  
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
All right, Mrs, uh, Selkirk.  What's the problem?
I don't know why I'm here.  I saw our Jim last night.
You, drempt about your late husband.  
No, no I saw him.  In the kitchen.
Right.
And he told me to come and see you.  "You go see that tosser, Doc Martin."  So, here we are.
We?
Me and Jim.  He's sitting over there.
Richard
Martin
Claire!  Claire!  Sorry, sorry.  Claire usually answers the door.
Yes, it can’t be easy.  
Martin
Juliet
Louisa
Martin
Juliet
Louis
Juliet
Louisa
Juliet
Richard
Martin
Theo
Martin
Juliet
Martin
Juliet
Martin
Juliet

Louisa
Martin

Richard
Juliet
Louisa
Juliet
Louisa
Louisa.
We've asked Louisa to come by because we're going to need her statement regarding the incident.
Uh, you asked me to drop these off.  You never mentioned anything about that.
I take it you're still intending to engage a solicitor.
We've made a formal complaint to the police about false imprisonment.
No!  He was only in there for five minutes or so.
Five?
Four minutes then.  Three.  I don't really know.  I wasn't there for most of it.
So, it could have been longer?
Is there any way we could speed this up?  It's just that we have our guests arriving.
Do you have any abdominal pain?
What's that?
Does it hurt there?  Um.  I need a stool sample.
What is wrong with him?
It's impossible to say until the test results come back.  I'll, um, preemptively treat him for Campylobacter.
I knew it.  It's the bird feces.
Bird feces, yes.  But not necessarily from a chicken house.
No.  It was probably that other time he was exposed to bird feces.  You're just protecting your aunt.  And where were
you when all this was happening?  Standing there cheering Mrs Norton on?
Toilet.
I have no intention of protecting anyone.  My relation to Mrs Norton has no bearing for my concern for your child's
health.  Antibiotics.  Two in the morning.  Two in the evening.  Stool.
Stool, um...
Oh, give it to me.  You'll only mess it up.
You know, Martin is a very, very good doctor.
You're carrying his child, aren't you?
I don't see what that's got to do with anything,  
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa

Martin
Louisa

Martin
Louisa
God help me.  I was three seconds away from really throttling them.
Yes, would have been better if you didn't speak at all.  Engaging them on the topic only made it worse.
Maybe you should try defending your aunt then instead of leaving it to me.
I have to remain impartial.
Impartial is fine.  Unemotional?  Not so good.
It seems like you've got enough emotions buzzing around for the pair of us right now.
So, you're saying I'm being what, then?
Well, emotional.  Obviously.  It's a product of hormonal imbalance.
Of course.  And much better to spend your time with people who don't show any feelings at all.
What do you mean?
Why don't you complain about it to your friend Edith then?  I'm sure she's the type who wouldn't let annoying things like
emotions get in the way.
What's Edith got to do with it?
I'm just saying that I'm glad that I'm hormonal because it's better than being cold and prickly and intimidating.  But if
that's what makes you happy, then that's fine then.  Great.  Good for you.
You're wearing odd shoes.
Hmmm?  Oh.   Shut up Martin!
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin

Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Our Jim told me to come back here.
Don't suppose he bothered to explain why.
No.
No, I thought not.
You don’t believe me, do you doctor?
Well, I believe that you believe you're seeing him.  And I think that's connected you your grief, lack of sleep, interrupted
eating patterns.
No, I've already had my five a day of fruit and veg.
Nevertheless, I don't really think you're in a fit state to take care of yourself.  Mrs. Selkirk?
I'm sorry Doctor, but our Jim thinks I really ought to see you.
What's today's date?
Thursday, the 15th.
Car, pencil, ambulance.  Repeat those three items.
Car, pencil, ambulance.
Yeah, well, I'd still like the district nurse to keep an eye on you.
Oh no, there's no need.  Joan's doing that.
No, Joan's not uh, qualified to.
Oh, never mind then.  Come on Jim.  
Martin
Theo
Feeling worse?
Yeah, you're here.
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
I didn't meant to say that.  It just came out.
No, you lied to me.
I had to.  I'm sorry Martin.
You have put me in an intolerable situation.
I had to.  They seemed hell-bent on suing me for something I haven't done.
You don't know that. What if the results come back and it IS your fault?
I don't know.
No, you don't.  You just lie and drag me into it.
I can't lose the farm.
I am a doctor.  I have to prioritize that boy's health.
Are you sure you've got your priorities right?  We're family, Martin.  That must mean something, even to you.
You jeopardize my integrity, place me in an impossible situation just to save face.  That's not my definition of family.
Your definition of family isn't even in the dictionary, Martin.  
Mrs Tishell
Martin
Mrs Tishell
Martin
Mrs Tishell

Martin
Mrs Tishell

Martin
Mrs Tishell
Martin
Mrs Tishell
Good afternoon, Doctor.
I need some tinidazole.  400 milligrams.
Tout de suite. Of course you know this isn't to be used when breast feeding or pregnant and certainly not with alcohol.
The patient's a seven year old boy.
I have a case to discuss with you doctor.  Mrs Selkirk.  She came in for topical arthritis preparation on her knee and her
behaviour was...odd.  She was...
I can't discuss a patient.
It upset me.  I don't like to see folks arguing.  Especially not with people who aren't there.  It's wrong.  She asked for eye
drops.  But only for one eye.  Don't you think that's interesting, Doctor?
No.
If I can be so bold, I think I have a diagnosis.  Time...of...life.
Goodbye.
Come back soon.  I'm always here for you.  
Pauline
Martin
Pauline
Martin
Pauline
Martin
Pauline
So, uh, someone sent you a CD in the post.  A Dr Milligan.
Give it to me.
"Sorry you felt uncomfortable seeing me.  I hope this helps."  What's she like then?
Who?
Dr Milligan.
He's a he.
Oh.  I've about a thousand questions I'd like to ask you at this point.  Al used to, um,  make me mix tapes when we
started going out.  Of course, he's got awful taste in music.  Sweaty men screaming down a microphone.  
Pauline
Martin
Pauline
Ammo-ee-bee-asis.  Theo Wenn.
Amoebiasis.  That's endemic in regions where they have inadequate modern sanitation systems.
Oh, well, that's not us lot since Bert gave up plumbing.  Bet the Wenn's will be pleased you've cracked it.  Probably
invite you for lunch, the weirdos.  
Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Martin
The ambulance is on its way and I haven't moved her.
What happened?
Well, I don't know.  I just found her lying in the sheep pen.
You didn't shut her in there, did you?  
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Aunt Joan
Mrs Selkirk

Martin
Mrs Selkirk
Martin

Aunt Joan
Martin
Aunt Joan
Mrs Selkirk
Martin
I'm not having hallucinations.
Yes, you are.
Hang, hang on, uh, Jim.  Yeah, yeah, yeah.  I'm just about to ask.  Who's gonna look after Sheila?
Don't worry, I'll make sure the sheep are taken care of.
See, this is why he couldn't cross over the other side.  He knew I was ill, and when you wouldn't help, he got Sheila to
butt me so that you'd have to come.
Absolute nonsense.  (Sheila butts Martin)
Oh, Sheila.
Right, um.  Auntie Joan.  You stay with Mrs Selkirk till the ambulance gets here.  I have to go and see the Wenn family.  
You'll be pleased to know the results came in.  You aren't responsible for their boy's illness.
Oh, really?  They came through?
It doesn't make what you did right.  Even if the nasty little boy did deserve it.
Thank you Marty.
Jim says you did him proud, Doc.
Yes.  I'm sure he does.  (gate opens on its own)
Theo
Martin
Theo
Martin
What do you want?
Well, you're obviously feeling better.  Your body must have reacted well with the drugs.
Uh uh.  I'm still ill, I don't feel better, and I can't go back to school for about a month.  So there!
You're a nasty, ill-mannered little boy, aren't you?  No doubt you'll grow into a nasty, ill-mannered adult.  
Martin
I just saved your life.  Imagine if that had happened and there'd been nobody here to help you.  You'd have died.  
Richard
Martin
Juliet
Martin
Richard
Martin

Claire
Martin
Dr Ellingham, welcome.  Do you know everyone?
No.
Doctor, did you finally manager to discern our son's mystery illness?
Yes.  I'd be careful with that unless you want to leave here with an amoebic infection.
Haa, haa.  You wouldn't know it from his reputation, but the doctor here has a wonderful sense of humour.
No, I haven't.  The boy's suffering from amobiasis.  A disease which is common in areas of poor sanitation and bad
hygiene.  And where the au pair doesn't wash her hands.
I do have a name, you know.
I suggest you pay a little more attention to your son's well being and a little less time organizing dinner parties to
impress the village idiots, and hiring solicitors.  Enjoy your meal.  
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Martin & Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
Louisa
Martin
They've got me bringing homework over.
Oh, right.  At least they care enough about that.
No, I just think they like ordering people around.
Umm.  Be nice if they applied that discipline...
...to their own boy.
Exactly. Well, sooner or later they'll have to own up.  Have to take responsibility for their own child.
Yes.
Uh, w-would you like me to take the homework in?
No, I can manage.  Got the right shoes on.
Yes.
.
.
MARTIN & LOUISA
Louisa calls Martin out to Aunt Joan's farm to attend to Theo Wenn when he has a reaction after Aunt Joan disciplines him by locking him in
the chicken coop.  Martin acts as the peacemaker when Louisa and Aunt Joan continue their argument over what has happened.  He then
says that he was often locked in the cupboard when he was a child.  He seems to indicate that it was a reasonable type of discipline, and that
it didn't affect him, but the startled look on Louisa's face says that this is news to her.  You also sense that she is thinking, "Oh yes, it didn't
affect you - NOT AT ALL!"
Martin and Louisa both end up at Theo Wenn's house.  Martin was called there because Theo has been getting worse.  Louisa thought she
was there just to drop off schoolwork, but they actually want a statement from her over the incident at Aunt Joan's farm.  Martin leaves and
Louisa is about to follow when she tells the Wenns, "You know, Martin is a very, very good doctor." Mrs Wenn responds with, "You're carrying
his child, aren't you?"  When they are both outside they begin to argue.  Martin thinks that Louisa should not have gotten into the discussion
about the incident, but Louisa says that someone had to defend his aunt.  He tells her that he is a doctor and needs to remain impartial.  She
tells him, "Impartial is fine.  Unemotional?  Not so good."  Martin say that she has enough emotions buzzing around for the both of them.  He
says it is a product of her hormonal imbalance.  Louisa sarcastically says that it's much better to spend time around people who don't show
any feelings.  He is puzzled and asks what she means.  Louisa responds, "Why don't you complain about it to your friend Edith then?  I'm
sure she's the type who wouldn't let annoying things like emotions get in the way."  Martin is even more puzzled and asks what Edith has to
do with it?  Louisa says, "I'm just saying that I'm glad that I'm hormonal because it's better than being cold and prickly and intimidating.  But if
that's what makes you happy, then that's fine then.  Great.  Good for you."  At that point, Martin has become distracted by Louisa's
mismatched shoes.  He points it out to her, she tells him to shut up and storms away.
As Martin is leaving Theo Wenn's house again, Louisa is arriving to deliver more homework.  This conversation is a bit calmer than the one
earlier.  They both now seem to be on the same page about the Wenns' lack of discipline for their son and that is punctuated when Martin
starts to say, "Be nice if they applied that discipline..." and in unison they say, "...to their own boy."  Martin then continues, "Well, sooner or
later they'll have to own up.  Have to take responsibility for their own child."  Louisa looks down at her growing baby bump and simply says,
"Yes."  They both seem to realize that this conversation could be about their expected child and there is a slight awkward pause.  Martin then
recovers and offers to take the homework up, but Louisa says she can manage and she shows him that she is now wearing the correct,
matching shoes.  Martin stands there and watches her walk into the house with a thoughtful, but pained look on his face.
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WARDROBE
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RECEPTIONIST
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